How to Get Back the iOS 7 SDK After Upgrading to Xcode 6

Seven

iOS 8 finally launched on September 17, and with it, the public release of Xcode 6. However, after upgrading you will notice that you can no longer compile using the iOS 7.1 base SDK. This is a problem for any app that isn’t yet compatible with the iOS 8 SDK. To see what SDK’s you have installed, open the Terminal app on your Mac and enter:

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How to Get Back the iOS 6 SDK After Upgrading to Xcode 5

iOS 7 finally launched on September 18, and with it, the public release of Xcode 5. However, after upgrading you will notice that you can no longer compile using the iOS 6.1 base SDK. This is a problem for any app that isn’t yet compatible with the iOS 7 SDK. To see what SDK’s you have installed, open the Terminal app on your Mac and enter:

ls /Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Platforms/iPhoneOS.platform/Developer/SDKs

If you only see the iOS7 SDK folder listed, you will need to extract the iOS6 SDK folder from an old copy of Xcode 4.6. Or you can just download it here. Copy your extracted iPhoneOS6.1.sdk folder into the folder shown above. Shut down and restart Xcode. You will then be able to select from both SDK’s when building or running.

If you just need to download the iOS 6 simulator, open Xcode and go to Xcode > Preferences > Downloads.

WWDC 2013 Keynote

The stakes were high for Apple to reinvent itself at this year’s Worldwide Developer Conference, with the tech world holding its breath to see its response after its recent stock and popularity slump. At yesterday’s Keynote address, Apple made several much-needed major new announcements. Ironically, many of the changes in OSX Mavericks and iOS 7 are copied directly from Microsoft, Google, and Palm (!), but that’s nothing new. Remember that Apple is not about being the first, but being the best. Take the iPod, iPhone, and iPad: MP3 players, cell phones, and tablet computers existed long before Apple refined them. Apple removes, refines, simplifies, and then raises the bar. In comparison to Android’s fast, splintered development, Apple can be perceived as slow. This may be why it has fallen out of favor with the tech media in the era of the 24-hour news cycle.

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